What Is An LOI And How To Write One

Letter Of Intent

What is an LOI

An LOI is a letter of intent/inquiry: Many Grantors will request an LOI as an initial letter before a grant proposal is submitted. Based on your letter of intent, the funding source will make the decision whether or not to accept a grant proposal from you. This way, the grantor can easily evaluate which organizations they feel are most viable to be considered for the award.

The grantor will also be able to receive a scope of how many organizations will be applying for the grant, and to prepare enough staff to review future grant proposals that will be submitted.

Remember that an LOI is your chance to create a good first impression for the funder. So be sure to follow all these steps for a successful LOI.

How to Write an LOI

Guidelines

Most grantors will provide you with guidelines of what they want in the LOI – these guidelines must be followed. Negligence to the guidelines will land your letter in the reject pile.

Summary

An LOI must be brief and engaging; it should summarize your grant proposal. At times, an LOI can be as long as 3 pages. Although this is not your grant proposal, so keep the letter clear and concise as to not bore the readers.

Business letter

Your LOI must follow a business letter structure. Be sure to use a business letterhead. Your company’s address should appear on the right-hand side and your recipient’s address needs to be on the left-hand side.

Since the LOI is written in a business letter style, you must write in a professional manner. It is best to avoid any general terminology to address the recipient.

Introduction

The opening part of your letter must be eye-catching as it is the first section that the grantor will be reading! It must be concise and engaging, so the reader is enticed to read further.

In your introduction, you must include your company’s name, the grant you are applying for, how much funding you are requesting, and a short summary of the project you need the money for.

It is extremely important to do your research on the funding source, so you can understand how to best appeal to the grantor. This will allow you to include how your specific project fits the funder’s interests and guidelines.

Programs and Objectives

After you have completed writing your opening on your LOI, write a brief summary of the history of your programs. The programs that you currently provide must align with the initiatives you seek to accomplish with the funding. 

Additionally, include a description of your target population and geographic area.

Make sure to elaborate on your objectives. It is essential to incorporate specifics, such as statistics, names of the programs, the program staff, etc.

Funding

Explain if you have received funding from any other sources and how much.  Be sure to mention any other grants that you have applied for.

Signing the LOI

Make sure to thank the funder for the opportunity to send in a letter of intent and to potentially apply for the grant. When signing the letter, use proper business salutations such as “respectfully” or “sincerely”.

There is an option to attach any additional forms to the LOI, but it is not necessary as this is not the grant proposal.

Review

Review the letter before submitting it. Check for proper spelling and grammar, factual mistakes, and that all guidelines were met. Make sure that what you have written in your letter of intent gives off the best impression of your organization!

Submit the LOI

Once your letter has been reviewed, submit your LOI to the funding source. Then you may wait for a message from the funder, through the post or email as to whether or not you have been accepted to submit a grant proposal to the grantor.

The Process of Hiring a Grant Writer on GrantWriterTeam

Step 1: Submit a grant writer request

Submit a request for a grant writer on GrantWriterTeam. In your grant writer’s request, you will need to include your primary purpose for hiring a grant writer, your funding/dollar needs, grants you are requesting to be written, etc. Make sure to include all necessary information so that your request will give the grant writers an understanding of what your project consists of. If your request is incomplete, you may need to revise it.

There is a $50 administrative fee for the submission of your request. Once your grant writer request is complete and paid for, GrantWriterTeam will publish your request on our Grant Writing Projects list and send your request to highly skilled and experienced professional grant writers.

Step 2: Receive bids on your request

The grant writers will respond with bids for your project, with their experience, expertise, a list of awarded grants, and writing samples.

They will also include their pricing structure. Grant writing fees vary according to the grant writer’s experience and expertise and the economy of the location where the grant writer resides. Grant writers set their own hourly fees, ranging from $40 an hour and up, for research, writing, and curriculum development. 

If you request a specific grant to be written, the bid will include a flat-rate fee for that grant, so you will be able to know how much the grant writer will charge for the entirety of the grant writing work for each grant requested in your project.

Step 3: Accept a bid

After you accept a bid– the grant writer will be given your contact information and will phone or email you. 

Step 4: Prepare a contract

Together you and the grant writer will be able to set up an online contract for your project, which consists of a retainer and a series of deliverables. With the contract, before you approve, you will be able to review the grant writer’s full resume and two references.

Step 5: Approve the contract

Once the contract is submitted to you for approval, you may request changes to be made to your contract. When the contract is approved, you need to pay the agreed-upon retainer and your grant writer will then start your project. Once each deliverable is complete, your grant writer will upload the completed work – requiring payment for the deliverable, and then you will be able to view the file(s) uploaded.

Step 6: Add more work needed

Would you like to work with your grant writer after all deliverables are complete? Simply ask your grant writer to add a new deliverable. You will then have to approve the newly added deliverables because they were not approved when you originally approved the contract. The grant writer can then proceed as usual and upload a file of completed work once each deliverable is completed.

Contact us

We at GrantWriterTeam are here to help you! If you have any questions regarding your process with GrantWriterTeam, email us at Support@GrantWriterTeam.com.

How to Optimize Your Resume as a Writer

Introduction

Writer CVs are a peculiar thing. Usually, people try to land their dream jobs by emphasizing their achievements in their resume. Then, HR staff and recruiters read through this and decide whether or not they want to meet the candidate. With writers, it’s a bit different – your resume is, at the same time, a piece of your portfolio. You will not only be judged by your work experience and skills (as is the case in other industries) but the very writing style of your CV.

That’s why we have prepared this guide to the tricky realm of resume writing for writers. Let’s have a look at how you can craft the best possible CV!

Make it text-dominant

The usual piece of advice when it comes to CV writing is to keep it short, succinct, and visual. Many people use CV templates and diagrams to say as much as they can visually and not waste too many words. The reason for this is to grab the attention of the reader (HR manager) and stand out from other prospective candidates.

This is one of the main differences between a regular resume and that of a writer. As a writer, you should use text as a tool and a weapon, and not resort to the attraction tricks of visual elements. Being able to capture the attention of your reader using pure text says a lot about your writing abilities.

Make it readable

At the same time, text-heavy pieces need to be organized and neatly structured. Another peculiarity in this sense is that you would usually use bullet points, lists and short sentences to get your point across. In a writer CV, it’s different. You want to show that you can tackle „long stories“ without resorting to lists or similar elements.

Still, there are many tricks that you can use to achieve that. For example, you should make your paragraphs shorter and make a beginning indent in each – this makes the readability higher for the person checking your CV. You can also split different sections under different headings and give them interesting names.

Hire experts

Many writers use paper writing services to help them craft the perfect CV. It seems counter-intuitive to hire someone else to do it for you, but you can usually get clearer insights into your CV from a different perspective.

You can also use the Grant Writer service for your resume needs. Writers on this service usually craft grant proposals, so they are knowledgeable in fixed-structure work that aims to impress the reader and present the subject in the best possible light.

Flaunt your creativity

Employers who are on the lookout for writers are usually searching for someone who can think outside of the box. In other words, you need to show that you know how to view and observe things from an unusual angle and make the reader think.

A resume (or your motivational letter) is the perfect chance to take a fixed, rigid structure that’s prone to clichés and corny phrases and make it completely your own. For example, if you like using humor or cynicism, you can even make a slight parody of the CV form.

Emphasize your strengths

When you continue with the hiring process, it’s the company’s turn to impress you with amazing employee experience. However, whether you like it or not, the CV is considered your turn to impress the employer. You won’t get too far by being too shy and humble, unfortunately. No matter how you usually approach your work and your stance on bragging, it’s actually the perfect time to do so in your resume.

Think about what the employer or client could gain from having you in their writing team, that they can hardly find in other writers. When you think about this, put yourself in their shoes. If you feel like your client would prefer speed to creativity, present that you are able to write very quickly (of course, only if you really are).

Refer readers to your portfolio

With every writer job application you submit, it is always best that you add a portfolio of writing samples you are most proud of. You should also emphasize that readers of your CV can see examples of your actual writing in the samples that you have enclosed. Unfortunately, the resume itself can sometimes divert too much attention from what really matters. If you are lucky, recruiters will be looking at your work first, and then the resume. However, it’s often the other way around.

Avoid clichés and buzzwords

This is a piece of advice that can be applied to any resume, but it’s infinitely more important for the CV of a professional writer. When you add cliché phrases to your CV, it is like you are instantly demonstrating a lack of skills to express yourself in an original way. This may be acceptable in a job application for a data scientist where other skills take centre place, but it should be absolutely avoided in a writer’s resume.

The sneaky thing about clichés and buzzwords is that you can start using them without actually becoming aware of it. They can even slip under your radar after you’ve read your CV several times. That’s why it’s a good idea to run it through writing checkers like Grammarly or ProWritingAid that will underline cliché phrases. 

Conclusion

A writers’ resume is important, but you should also emphasize your portfolio and writing samples. In most cases, employers and potential clients will focus more on these than the resume itself. That said, it is still important to make sure your CV is high-quality, especially when it comes to correctness. In writer resumes, there is zero-tolerance for mistakes. 

Dorian Martin is a professional writer working with the best dissertation service for PhD students. He helps students around the world submit high-quality, innovative work on time. Dorian is especially interested in the fields of HR and psychology.

What Nonprofit Start-Ups Need Before Hiring a Grant Writer

Many new nonprofits seek funding at the beginning of their journey. However, some grants require specifics that your nonprofit organization may not be ready for.

Many Nonprofit start-ups hire grant writers without the proper funding and proper paperwork for their project. This may result in a waste of time and money. To prevent this from happening, ensure that you are actually ready to hire a grant writer. 

These are some things that nonprofits need before hiring a grant writer.

Stable Funding: Before applying for a grant, make sure that you have the proper funding to prove to the grantor that you are a worthwhile investment. Foundations do not want to grant funding to nonprofits that will fold. Many grantors require an outline of your budget in your application.

Further, grant writers do not work based on commission. Your nonprofit must have the proper funding to pay the grant writer before any award from the funding source is granted. If you tell the grant writer that you only have $200 for your project; there is not much work the grant writer can do for you. Moreover, grant writers will not agree to take on a project that only involves grant research because that is all your organization can afford.

Crowdfunding is a great way to gain funding for your organization before hiring a grant writer. YouHelp is the perfect platform in which you can create a fundraising campaign for your nonprofit start-up.

Accomplishments: When grantors view applications, they want to award the organization that most qualifies to win the grant money. You must be able to prove to the grantor that you are worthy of receiving the funding. In order to do so, make sure that you have made some accomplishments that you can put in your grant proposal.

Clear Direction: If you are unclear as to what your organization stands for or specializes in, you are not ready to hire a grant writer. You need to have a plan as to what your organization programs are/will be, what you stand for, what you need the funding for, etc. Grant writers expect to receive clear information from you. Without the proper direction and organization, the grant research and/or grant writing process can become a difficult maze.

Moreover, to apply for a grant, you need to be clear in your direction. Your grant proposal must be concise and understandable. If you don’t know the details of your own nonprofit, how will your grant writer prepare the grant proposal for you? Grantors award their funds to organizations that have a clear plan and goal. As said before, they want to make sure you are a worthwhile investment.

So before hiring a grant writer, make sure to have a clear, focused, and organized plan for your nonprofit organization.

Paperwork: Grants are extremely detailed oriented and require a lot of planning. The funding source may require some legal and financial paperwork (IRS 501C3, tax return, etc.) to authenticate that you are a liable organization and meet their qualifications. It is frustrating for a grant writer to constantly ask for details and paperwork that are needed for the grant. This is time-consuming and will cost you a lot of money.

Look at examples of grant applications, so that you can see what information you need so that it is available for the grant writer immediately. 

Make sure you have all information ready before you hire a grant writer. So that your grant writer will have to work fewer hours on your project and the process will be smooth and quick.

When you are ready to hire a grant writer

When you have stable funding, some accomplishments, a clear direction, and have collected the necessary paperwork for your project; you may hire a grant writer. GrantWriterTeam has many experienced grant writers that can take on your project today!

Why Your Grant Proposal May Have Been Denied and What To Do About It

Denied Grant Proposal

A denial letter from a grantor can be very discouraging, yet it is a common occurrence. When applying for a grant, there are always high hopes for an award. Although, many times the results are not what is wished for. 

When applying for any grant, you must know that an award is never guaranteed!

Rejection is one more step towards acceptance. Just because a grant proposal was denied, does not mean that your organization/company cannot gain funding from another grantor.

There are many reasons donors deny funding:

Capacity to give: Many funding sources have a finite amount of monies they can give each cycle, and most of what is requested from organizations exceed their budget. 

Competitiveness: In addition to this, many grants are competitive, and thus there is not enough funding available for all applicants. When applying for a competitive grant, there is less of a chance that your organization will be awarded the grant.

Priorities Wanted: Grantors have specific priorities and qualifications for the organizations that they want to give their funding to. If your organization technically meets the requirements, but only “touches” upon some priorities, it is less likely to receive the awarded grant.

Quality of the proposal: The biggest and most obvious reason would be the quality of the proposal. Grantors want to ensure that they are giving their funds to organizations that are worthy of it. If an organization fails to abide by the guidelines given (font, page limits, margin,etc.), an automatic red flag is presented. Furthermore, if the grant proposal was not well written, and presents a weak program design, grantors will most probably deny the application. Grant proposals must be clear, concise, and compelling. 

What to do if your grant proposal is denied

Get feedback from the grantor

Knowing the reason behind your denial letter will only improve your chances of being awarded a grant in the future. If your grant proposal was rejected by a grantor, make sure to send them a thank you letter for allowing you to have the opportunity to apply for their grant.

Moreover, contact the program officer and ask why your proposal was denied and for feedback on how you can improve your grant proposal for the future.

Apply for more grants

Accept all feedback and edit your grant proposal accordingly. There are many other grants accepting applications. GrantWatch is a great platform in which you can search for grants that are applicable to your organization’s needs.

As grants are never a guarantee, make sure to apply for several grants, so that if one funding source denies your award, you have the chance of receiving funding from another grantor.

Hire a grant writer

Grant writing is a tedious process, so you may choose to hire a grant writer for future grants. GrantWriterTeam is a great platform to hire a grant writer for your organization. Grant writers are experienced in what they do and they can greatly increase your chances of being awarded the grant. Grant writers can research grants that you qualify for and have a good chance of being awarded. They also have the writing skills to create a high-quality application.

Save the grant proposal written and hand it to your grant writer, so that he/she has a base to start with to apply for new grants. 

7 Mistakes Nonprofits Make When Hiring a Grant Writer

Grant writing is a job suitable for a meticulous and skillful individual. Hiring a professional grant writer is one of the most significant investments a nonprofit organization can make. The right hire ensures that the organization never runs out of funds.

Your grant writer should capture the entire story of your organization in a concise and definite manner. They also need to have an excellent team spirit by cooperating with multiple stakeholders and working within the indicated timeframe always. Hiring a grant writer is undoubtedly no child’s play and should not be taken lightly.

It is noteworthy that grant writers not only ensure proper and continuous funding of your nonprofit. They also build secure long-lasting connections with funders for your organization.

Separating writers who had their resumes put together for them from individuals who genuinely have the copywriting skills to secure your grant can be very tricky. Any poor writing could stop your funding or even jeopardize your organization’s reputation.

Nonprofits overlook some vital information when hiring grant writers. Here are some mistakes they make:

  1. Unclear Mission and Objectives:
    The first thing to consider when hiring grant writers is your mission and objectives. The main reason nonprofits hire grant writers is to enhance their work. If your project or organization’s objectives are unclear, the writer won’t capture the project goals effectively or add details that would convince sponsors to disburse the grant.

    An organization without the right objectives or mission cannot hire the right person or position the grant writer for success. Unfortunately, some nonprofits don’t consider this. Their unclear objectives result in:

    HIRING THE WRONG WRITER – Without the right objectives, you can’t guarantee that a writer is suitable for the role. You may hire an individual for the wrong reasons or not be able to test potential hires for the specifics of the project appropriately.

    LACK OF A STRUCTURED HIRING PROCESS – Finding the right grant writer doesn’t happen immediately. However, unclear objectives could delay the hiring process. Since the project mission and goals aren’t clear, it would take longer to put the project details together. In the end, the nonprofit would have to meet deadlines or complete the project within the stipulated timeline.

    Therefore, they prioritize speed over quality because they’re under pressure to fill the role as soon as possible. They might end up skipping essential steps in the hiring process or hire the first candidate that seems without making sure that the individual can execute the job properly.

    Before hiring a grant writer, nonprofits ought to ask for updated resumes. A resume shows you if your prospect is as skillful as they claim. An outdated resume lacks a history of past feats achieved and sample grants from recent jobs that were successfully funded. You’d also need to ask for references from three clients the writer has worked with.
  2. Accepting an Outdated Resume:
    Before hiring a grant writer, nonprofits ought to ask for updated resumes. A resume shows you if your prospect is as skillful as they claim. An outdated resume lacks a history of past feats achieved and sample grants from recent jobs that were successfully funded. You’d also need to ask for references from three clients the writer has worked with. Nonprofits end up skipping this essential step by allowing outdated resumes that don’t capture the individual’s skills Nonprofits end up skipping this essential step by allowing outdated resumes that don’t capture the individual’s skills.
  3. Cutting Costs:
    Most times, the promised remuneration could determine the quality of a job. The amount of salary you budget for the job post can go a long way in choosing qualified candidates who know vital grant writing techniques.

    Specific nonprofits estimate way too low for salaries of grant writers. Therefore, they settle for just rookie grant writers who would do the job at a lesser price. This action jeopardizes the quality and success of the job.

    Some organizations try to spend the least amount of money possible on every project. In the bid to cut costs, they discard skilled and experienced consultants for less qualified individuals.

    The proposal is crucial to securing the grant. Discarding skilled individuals for less qualified writers won’t give you the chance to get the proposal that could secure the grant.
  4. Overlooking Evidence of Past Success:
    Evidence of prior success refers to the previous jobs done by the prospective grant writers and how they ensured the organization’s funding. To get this information, you need to call the three clients (references) listed in the candidate’s resume.

    Getting honest essay writing service reviews of the candidate from these previous clients might be tough because they won’t want to tamper with the individual’s chances. Therefore, ask questions about the point(s) they feel the candidate could improve on. Also, ask the candidate about their previous work experience. Any negative comment about former clients is a big no-no, you shouldn’t hire such a grant writer.

    Some nonprofits don’t want to go through this seemingly rigorous task and thus hire grant writers without getting a review from previous clients.
  5. Hiring Candidates Who Lack Team Spirit:
    Every grant writer you hire should be able to work with other stakeholders and have a good relationship with funders. One way to discover a lack of team spirit in a potential hire is to listen to what they say during the interview. Be wary of candidates who keep emphasizing how they can work alone even when you suggest putting them in a team; it’s a red flag.

    Every grant is about having a team.
    A full team of grant writers consists of a grant manager whose job is to supervise the whole group, a project monitoring and evaluating officer, a procurement officer, and a project finance officer. Additionally, there can be technical officers in charge of the e-mails and a communication officer for publicity.

    There should be synergy between everyone in the team to ensure efficiency. Nonprofits trying to save costs end up hiring a few hands consisting of loners with a low level of expertise.
  6. Lack of Consideration for Organizational Skills:
    Candidates with organizational skills should have a work plan and project development objectives. Potential hires should tell you how they can meet up with deadlines and ask how they would handle the situation if they ever missed a deadline.

    However, most nonprofits don’t put the organizational skills of candidates into consideration. Therefore, they overlook it during the hiring process. This action could lead to hiring the wrong grant writer.
  7. Hiring Candidates Who Lack Passion:
    A candidate’s personality can go a long way in letting you know how passionate they are about the job. Most nonprofits focus solely on the candidate’s experience and skills, failing to recognize that character and attitude are also important. The grant writer’s personality should match the company’s culture.

    Additionally, serious candidates who look forward to your nonprofit’s success should ask questions about your projects. It showcases their passion. Passion is often overlooked during the interview stage, leading to employing writers that are unsuitable for the job.

    You may want to conduct a personality test so you can hire the right grant writer. As an NGO, you wouldn’t want your proposal only to show facts and figures. It should relate to humanity and appeal to emotions to depict the NGO’s real culture and identity.

Conclusion

For your nonprofit organization to make headway and never run bankrupt, it’s imperative to avoid these mistakes so you’d get a grant writer whose proposal attracts funds.

Why Nonprofit Organizations Should Hire a Grant Writer

Nonprofit organizations work their best to benefit communities. Since nonprofits do not generate their revenue from their vital services, they seek to gain funding from other resources. 

One of the main methods that nonprofits use for funding is the securing of grants. Grants allow nonprofits to receive the proper funding to continue servicing their communities. Grants are not awarded to those that need it more, but to those who submit the best application. A nonprofit will be awarded a competitive grant if it submits a high-quality grant application. Thus, nonprofits must work to submit the highest quality application that they can. Hence, grant writers are very much needed. 

By hiring a grant writer, nonprofits have a greater chance to be awarded a grant, as their grant proposal will be written by an experienced writer. 

Hiring a grant writer may seem expensive. But, the cost of the job is only a small percentage of the funding a nonprofit can gain from the grant. 

As time is crucial for many grants with a deadline, hiring a grant writer will ensure that the application is written on time. By designating the grant writing job to a professional grant writer, grant writing will be done on time and will allow the nonprofit to be busy with other tasks. Furthermore, every successful grant proposal starts with good research of the grants that can benefit one’s nonprofit organization. 

What can a grant writer do for you?

Grant writers can do the research for you. This can save you time and work. In addition to this, grant writers can write up a curriculum for you. Moreover, grant writers may help a nonprofit by managing their YouHelp page, which is a campaign that will help an organization gain crowdfunding. Many grant writers take on grant writing jobs for a living, so they work hard at improving their writing skills and seek to have the grant awarded for their clients. Many grant writers also support the cause of the nonprofit organization and will then deliver a great grant proposal.  

Hiring a grant writer requires communication. Which may be helpful for a nonprofit. By effectively communicating with the grant writer your program and funding needs, the grant writer will be able to write up an accurate grant proposal. Furthermore, this will help the nonprofit review their analytics and their needs. Thus, your organization can plan what goals need to be refined and develop a focus on what tasks are needed to succeed.

If you work for or own a nonprofit organization, definitely consider hiring a grant writer! 


We have many experienced grant writers onhttps://www.grantwriterteam.com/.