Gain Grant Writing Opportunities by Expanding Your Client Base

Grant Writing Opportunities

Being a Grant Writer exposes you to many interesting opportunities. It allows you to work with all different kinds of nonprofits, individuals and businesses. Some grant writers specialize in a certain category of grants or clients, such as minority groups, disaster relief, start-up businesses, technology grants, and the like. After all, grant writing opportunities exist in many fields.

Work with a Variety of Clients

It’s worth noting that grant writers who work with many different clients and on different grants are well-rounded freelance writers. Additional exposure to different aspects of grant writing will only increase your grant writing skills and will add an impressive attribute to your grant writer’s resume. 

Furthermore, the beauty of working with many different clients is that it allows you to learn about a variety of topics. This increases your store of knowledge across many fields and may also provide you with a new world view!

Each client comes with a different background and a different need. Some nonprofits have been around for many years and have applied for many grants. Other nonprofits are start-ups that have just begun their grant journey. You may work with one client applying for a federal grant awarding a large sum of money or with a client applying for a small foundation grant.

Help Those in Need

Moreover, grant writing can fulfill your satisfaction of helping those in need. Grant writing is a much-needed profession for nonprofits with goals to help several communities, low-income individuals, minority groups, youth, women, and the like. It is a great feeling to help organizations gain funding for meaningful causes.

Expand Your Clientele

Expanding one’s clientele is essential in opening new opportunities for grant writers. Not all clients will need your services for an extensive amount of time. Some organizations choose to apply for grants at only certain times of the year. Therefore, gaining more clients is imperative to being a successful grant writer and having a steady constant income. 

At GrantWriterTeam, new grant writing projects are added to the list almost every day. This allows grant writers to expand their clientele and work with several different nonprofits and businesses for many different causes. It can open you to a world of opportunity. 

You may join the GrantWriterTeam as a grant writer and take on several grant writing projects by bidding on the project, establishing your own rates, and preparing a contract according to the client’s needs. 

Grant Writer Finds Meaning in Work

TP, a grant writer on GrantWriterTeam, noted how it helps get new clients for independent writers! “GrantWriterTeam has been a meaningful partner in my endeavors to expand my clientele. Thank you, Libby!”

Work on Unique Projects

Each client has their own unique cause and background. As a grant writer, your job is to satisfy their needs and help them reach their goals. You may also guide them as to where their best options for receiving funding lie. As a grant writer, you must be creative and adjust your pen for each distinctive client, to provide work that is best needed for their specific cause and need.

For example, if the organization is not fundable for grants yet, recommend a crowdfunding campaign on YouHelp.com. You may help the client create a fundraising campaign and charge per hour to set up the campaign and send it out to gain exposure. 

Furthermore, if a client does not yet have a budget plan set up, be sure to work on budget development for that organization. Some clients may already have this set up and some newer start-ups may not.

Many Benefits in Grant Writing

Grant Writers have the benefit of working with so many different organizations and receiving a broad education pertaining to a wide variety of subjects. Additionally, expanding one’s clientele ensures a constant flow of income. GrantWriterTeam may be a great avenue to gaining grant writing opportunities.

Nonprofit Wins a Housing Grant for $35,000

Selecting the Grant Writer

The Community Health Resource Center, Inc. had requested a grant writer on GrantWriterTeam for a housing grant. They accepted the bid of Michelle11, and she wrote a grant proposal for the Section 4 Capacity Building Grants. The nonprofit had found this grant on GrantWatch and requested the grant writer to apply for this grant on behalf of its organization.

Section 4 Capacity Grants

The grantor, Enterprise Community Partners, offers Grants to USA nonprofit community development and housing organizations. It is also available to tribes and tribal housing entities, and authorities serving rural areas. Funding is intended to enhance the capacity and ability to carry out affordable housing and community development activities that benefit low- and moderate-income families and persons.

Grant Writer’s Work

By viewing the grant on GrantWatch, the grant writer reviewed the eligibility requirements for an applicant and concluded that Community Health Resource Center was an eligible 501(c)(3) applicant for the grant.

Together, the client and the grant writer prepared a contract to work on the grant writing project.

The grant writer has written the proposal on behalf of her client, requesting funding for the African American Community Resource Ambassadors (CRA). The grant would help move families in rural communities from transitional housing to more permanent housing, while increasing life skills and financial stability.

Award Letter

Lo and behold, the client received an award letter from Enterprise Community Partners, the funding source, stating; “We are pleased to inform you that Community Health Resource Center, Inc. has been tentatively selected to receive a $35,000.00 award under Enterprise’s Section 4 Capacity Building Grants Program – Rural & Native American Initiative.”

The Client’s Testimony

With that, Fredell Buttler, of Community Health Resource Center, attested: “Michele11 has demonstrated an exceptional capacity to listen, interpret and articulate the priorities aligned with achieving desired objectives. She is extremely competent, personable and thoughtful in her approaches to enhance our efforts toward servicing Veterans and families within rural communities.“

Affordable Housing Needed

Many low-income families are in need of housing. Especially during the pandemic, many people have lost their livelihoods and, with that, their homes. Housing is an essential need for many individuals that cannot afford a place to live.

Housing Grants Are Available

Nonprofit organizations that specialize in housing or operate housing programs apply for grants to gain funding so that they can provide affordable housing to minorities and low-income individuals.

GrantWatch has many housing grants for nonprofits, businesses, and individuals. An organization may hire a grant writer to apply for a housing grant at GrantWriterTeam. By delegating the grant writing to a professional, it may significantly increase their chances of winning the grant! Furthermore, this will allow the grant to be written in a timely fashion.

Your nonprofit may walk in the footsteps of Community Health Resource Center, Inc. and win a grant to help those in need of housing!

 If you have any questions about this grant, or any other grant or grant category listed on our website, feel free to reach out! You can contact our incredible customer service team at 561-249-4129.

Grants For Businesses Affected By Covid-19

Businesses affected by Covid-19

Businesses struggle due to Covid-19

The pandemic has led to an unfortunate situation for many businesses. Many businesses were forced to close their doors due to the safety measures needed. If there was no online option for the business, no revenue was being generated. Furthermore, businesses that operated online lost many sales, because many buyers could not afford to buy, as they themselves were out of business. However, there are business grants available, especially for small businesses.

The pandemic has led to a great decline in our economy, with many businesses shutting down because there was not enough revenue to pay their expenses. 

Finding a grant 

Many businesses are seeking a path to recovery. Grants are a great option to pursue Covid-19 relief. GrantWatch has many grants available in the Covid-19 sector

Along with this, many organizations and government foundations are awarding grants to businesses that are suffering from Covid-19 so that they can get back on their feet. This is essential for a thriving economy. 

Hire a grant writer

Businesses have also sought to hire a grant writer to succeed in winning the grant. For example: A Grant Writer is Needed for Covid-19 Relief for a law practice. The client wishes to apply for the California Small Business Covid-19 Relief Program. A Grant Writer is also needed for an Auto Sales Businesses affected by Covid-19.

Applying for grants for businesses

Many businesses may think that they are not eligible for grants as they generate their own revenue. However, there is a whole world of grants for small businesses.

Searching and writing grants for your business may be a great option to receive Covid-19 relief. However, keep in mind that a grant award is never a guarantee, and generally there are many other applicants applying for the same grant. 

Tips for applying for grants for businesses:

  1. Make sure the information in your grant application is accurate. Your budget must make sense. If the math doesn’t add up, the funding source can easily recognize an error. Be honest about your finances.
  2. Get to know the funding source and their interests so that you can appeal to them.
  3. Stand out from the other applicants. Highlight your unique attributes, such as a unique program or a unique clientele/audience.
  4. Seek expert help, such as a grant writer and/or an accountant to help you write the best application you can.
  5. Keep in touch with the grantor and create a relationship with them prior to submitting your application.

There are resources that can help with grants for businesses

Since many businesses have been suffering from the Covid-19 restrictions, many are seeking a way to generate revenue. Hence, grants have become even more popular amongst businesses during these times. 

Some businesses have chosen to write the grants themselves or to hire a grant writer. Whichever way you may choose, there are many resources available for your grant journey. 

GrantWatch is a great place to find business grants to apply for. Additionally, GrantWriterTeam is a platform in which you can hire a grant writer.

 In addition to grants, your business may pursue a crowdfunding option. YouHelp.com allows you to create a crowdfunding campaign for your business. YouHelp also has many crowdfunding coaches that you can schedule an appointment with twice a week.

The Social Dynamics of Grant Writing

Social Dynamics

In 2021, it’s no surprise that there’s a social element to grant writing. After all, social media has become a vital tool for nonprofits in many ways. This includes using social channels to reach out to grant funders, or for making donation forms easier to share. And social media isn’t even the only way to add a more social element to your grant writing.

In fact, many grantmaking organizations prefer that you reach out and introduce yourself before you submit your application. The only time it’s not appropriate to reach out before submitting is if the funder specifically asks you not to, or if they don’t offer contact information.

However, many grant writers are still concerned about reaching out on social media. Today, we’re offering you four steps you can take to build a relationship with grant funding organizations: 

1. Reach out to introduce your organization.

Reaching out via social media allows funders to start familiarizing themselves with your organization before you even submit your application. This first contact is a great way to ask questions about the submission process, the funding organization’s preferences, and to make sure the program you’re seeking to fund is something the organization is interested in supporting.

What’s more, taking the time to ask well-thought-out questions in advance will help you to stay top-of-mind.

Historically, it’s been common practice to reach out via phone or email if you can find the correct contact information. With LinkedIn becoming standard, it never hurts to reach out on there if you can’t find other contact information. This will work even better if you have a common connection who can arrange an introduction.

If you’re reaching out to a local grant funder, it’s advantageous to request a one-on-one meeting, even if it’s virtual. If they don’t have time for a meeting, ask if you can follow up with email or LinkedIn.

2. Follow up after you submit your application.

Once you’ve made contact, put your best work into your grant application and submit it. After submission, reach out to the funder to check on the status of your application, if they allow for it. Just make sure you’ve given the funder a reasonable amount of time to review your application first!

Not only will this help you reinforce the importance of receiving funding, but it also shows that you were earnest about creating a relationship with the organization.

3. Say thank you (even if you were turned down).

Whether your application was accepted or not, reach out to the funding organization and thank them. If your grant application was successful, it’s an even better idea to give the funding organization a call.

A phone call is generally considered to be more thoughtful. This gives you a chance to ask if you’ll need to supply progress reports in order to accept the grant. You can also use this call to offer representatives from the funding organization a tour of your facility so they can see your organization in action (once it’s safe, of course).

Even if your application was rejected, thank the funding organization for taking the time to consider you. If they gave you feedback on your application, make sure to thank them for their advice, as this advice could help you secure future grants.

If they didn’t automatically respond with advice, consider asking the funder what you can do to strengthen your application.

4. Stay in touch.

Now that you’ve received your funding, you have the chance to build a long-lasting relationship with the funding organization. To do this, you’ll want to go beyond just sending them any required progress reports.

Start by sending the funder a handwritten note. Have the note signed by several members of your staff, including those in leadership roles. You can also send them your organization’s regular newsletter with a special note attached. Finally, make sure to send additional periodic updates—preferably with pictures and videos—to show just how much the grant has made a difference.

Making sure the funding organization knows they made the right choice helps you cultivate the relationship. This improves your chances of being considered for further grants. Grant funders want to trust that their money made a difference—showing them that your organization is a good steward of resources will demonstrate their faith in your organization was not misplaced!

Conclusion

There’s more to grant writing than researching opportunities and submitting the applications. Social connections make the process of applying for and winning grants easier. By keeping the channels of communication open, you’re creating relationships that can benefit your organization now and well into the future.

And if you’re organization is strapped for time and thinking about hiring a grant writer, make sure you don’t make these seven mistakes when hiring your first grant writer!