New Year’s Financial Resolutions for NonProfits

New Year’s Financial Resolutions for NonProfits

Create a reasonable budget

As this year is coming to a close, nonprofits may be viewing their finances for the past year. It is important to utilize this information as a benchmark to create a budget for the upcoming year of 2021. It is essential to create a reasonable budget so that you can make informed decisions on what you can accomplish with your funds.

Develop strong fundraising goals

Once you create a budget, you need to view how much revenue you may need to generate through fundraising. It’s best to have a plan on how to accomplish this goal. YouHelp.com is a fundraising site that allows you to schedule appointments with crowdfunding coaches that can guide you in reaching this goal.

Diversify your funding sources

Not all revenue is generated through crowdfunding, and there are many options that you can utilize to gain funding. These opportunities may include, corporate sponsors, government contracts, foundation grants, fee for service, or earned income.

Create a list of grants to apply for

Begin researching grants for the upcoming year, as It is important to have a plan of what grants you can apply for the following year. GrantWatch is a grants database that can allow you to research grants for your nonprofit. There is a feature that can be utilized called ‘My Grant Calendar’, in which you can add grants that you would like to apply for in the future. You may then modify the dates to notify you when to look back at them – so that you can keep track of the grants. 

Hire a Grant Writer

Hiring a grant writer at the beginning of the year can aid your nonprofit to find the proper funding options and map out a plan for the application of grants for the upcoming year. With their expertise, they can research the best grants to apply for. Further, they can write the grants for you. They may also have you create a program to apply for a specific grant. 


You may hire a grant writer for your nonprofit on GrantWriterTeam that can prepare a contract with you for the following year.

Developing Your Leadership Potential – 8 Methods in Which Writing Can Help Motivate Others

Writing

From writing high-school letters and essays to social media posts and e-mail messages, we all have been into writing in some way or the other. However, many of us have never discovered the power of our writing.

Yes, the written word has the power to uplift, encourage, and energize others. It can sway hearts, deepen convictions, and even increase employee productivity. Writing inspiring lines are enough to motivate others. A dispirited coworker can be encouraged to work with full potential, disheartened friends can be cheered to have a new look at life, and depressed individuals can be driven towards hope.

Writing has a lot of potentials. It’s all about discovering our hidden talent. Let us learn how we can contribute to motivating others for a positive cause through writing. Here are a few ways:

1. Dive into the World of Writing

Though it might seem daunting, writing is the simplest task. A blank page is enough to scare even a highly skilled blogger. However, practice is the key to success.

“Write. Rewrite. When not writing or rewriting, read. I know of no shortcuts.” – Larry L. King

Set daily goals and write freely. Technical skills like 3D animation, designing, and film-editing are not required in writing. All you need is a good cup of coffee, a nice editor, and a topic of your interest.

With time, you will observe your tone. Change it into a persuasive style. Keep practicing until you get the best outcome. Join a good platform for motivational writers. GrantWriterTeam can be the right choice for you.

It is a platform where you can hunt for the best writers. Grant Writer Team provides a variety of services to grant seekers and other non-profit organizations. They also write a well-researched curriculum as per the customized needs.

Be sure to practice grant writing before joining their team. They connect the grant seekers with writers. Grant writers are required to write excellent content to get enough grants. The process is transparent as the writer connects directly with the grant seekers. Writers have the liberty to bid on the jobs of their choice.

The writing team has great experience in raising money on YouHelp.com. They create commendable marketing plans and effective campaigns for social media. Besides this, the team is smart enough in identifying new revenue opportunities.

2. Discover Your Style

While some people love to write about real-life examples and role models, others are comfortable with spiritual write-ups. You can also include personal experiences and stories in your writing. Thus, there are various ways to motivate others. Choose a style in which you are most comfortable and stick to it.

3. Don’t Copy, Brainstorm Ideas

As a writer, you must show your unique talent. Never copy others’ ideas. A single topic can be written in multiple ways. Show your expertise in your unique style. Remember, if you want to inspire others, you need to become a role model. Copying ideas can never create a unique identity. Be yourself and showcase your distinctive personality.

Before you start writing, give yourself 10 minutes for brainstorming. Jot down your ideas on a piece of paper and connect with some nice and persuasive verbs.

For instance, many writers wrote about precautionary measures during COVID-19. Some focused on hand sanitization and social distancing, while others emphasized every minute detail, including home sanitization, carpet cleaning, high-touch surface sanitization, etc.

4. Write with Freedom

One essential thing for writers to inspire others is to write with freedom. Do not hesitate to write what you think is right. Always expect a lot of editing, rewriting, and error in your first draft. However, it is completely normal. Write with a free mind. Never let any restrictions and doubts

become your barrier. Write what you think is right, and you will always get a chance to polish your content.

5. Include Relevant Quotes

No matter what your topic is, adding some relevant quotations can add weight to the content. If there are no quotations at all, the content will be a mix of headings and subheadings. In order to give a break to your readers, add quotes. However, be sure to pick the right ones.

For instance, if you are writing business content, pick up quotes from successful businessmen of the world. In the same way, if the content is related to psychological disorders, write quotes from the best psychologists.

Choose an ideal place to fix quotes. It can be at the start of the content, in between paragraphs, or at the end. Though quotations make your content gleam, do not overuse them. Adding a single quote in a 400-word essay is enough.

6. Connect With Your Readers

Good leadership writers always try to connect with their readers. There are several ways of increasing connections and communication. Adding CTAs in your content, asking questions directly with the readers, and giving social media buttons are a few options. Apart from it, responsiveness is another great tactic. Writers, who are good at inspiring others, always show responsiveness to their readers. Replying to comments on blogs, websites, and social media is mandatory for connectivity.

7. Persuade Other with Self-Reflection

Look into your life, connect your experiences with the topic, and let others know what you have learned so far. No book can give the same feeling of the knowledge gained through a writer’s self-reflection. It can either be a negative or a positive event. Recall your memorable and challenging days of life. No one else can explain your life events in a better way than you. Let others learn the same experience that you have learned from your mistakes.

8. Show Authenticity

Never underestimate your skills. You may find a gazillion content pages on the same topic you are writing about. However, the gist of the content is always different. Every writer has something unique to share with others. You may have a different point of view on the topic written by a fellow writer. Always showcase your authenticity. Write every word with an open heart, putting yourself in the shoes of others.

Wrapping It Up

In short, writing has a lot of power. This is the reason why great writers are always great leaders. Unlocking the leadership potential in writing requires a few simple tactics. Immense practice, self-reflection, unique style, quotations, freedom, and authenticity are essential for motivating others through your write-ups.

Incorporate the above-mentioned methods in your writing and start making a difference. No matter what your niche is, if you have adopted the right style, tactics, and exclusive ideas, you can inspire others in no time.

Don’t let COVID-19 Slow Down Your Grant Writing Efforts!

By Quentin2, Ph.D., a Grant Writer on GrantWriterTeam

 Don't Let Covid-19 Slow Down Your Grant Writing
Write – Image from Pixabay

To many, COVID-19 has been a nightmare and bane to individuals and businesses in many countries worldwide. In many of these settings, the result is mass unemployment, poverty, food lines, food banks, and utter despair. We as Grantwriters have a unique opportunity to actually benefit in spite of the more often negatively reported impact of the pandemic. in fact, COVID-19 actually offers us some unique opportunities;

C is for the confidence that our clients show in initially signing up for GrantWriterTeam and selecting us to pursue their grant getting dreams. This confidence is shored up by us as we assertively search and find sources within our constantly growing and abundant databases. That confidence is extended in the faith through which our clients trust us as we assemble and submit fundable grants. This process, in the main, is unencumbered by anything “COVID-19 like”.

O is for our abilities to observe trends, styles and scenarios set in place by the funding agencies and extend those observations to our clients. We observe and orchestrate the fit between our clients’ capabilities to sustain grants and the demands of the funding agencies. This process also seems immune to the societal shock waves caused by an uncertain COVID-19 crisis. We further observe that social distancing masking, and super spreader events are irrelevant to the grant getting process.

V is for the vigilance we must show to offset the swarm of doom and gloom messages often conveyed by the media to our clients regarding stalls in the workforce and economic contingencies. We as Grant writers know the truth that the viability and validity of the robust grants in our database have to be mined and will, “with all things being equal” yield phenomenal chances of being funded.

I is for the Letter of Intent which is the entry point we use to introduce our clients to finding agencies. Our hellos are not punctuated with the distance mandated during this crisis, but actually pulls our clients ever closer to receiving their requested funds.

D is for the determination we show in meeting our clients by ”any means necessary”, we Skype, Zoom, phone, and social distance our way, even as COVID-19 grows around us. We have the opportunity to thrive in this pandemic if we just breathe lightly.

What Is An LOI And How To Write One

Letter Of Intent

What is an LOI

An LOI is a letter of intent/inquiry: Many Grantors will request an LOI as an initial letter before a grant proposal is submitted. Based on your letter of intent, the funding source will make the decision whether or not to accept a grant proposal from you. This way, the grantor can easily evaluate which organizations they feel are most viable to be considered for the award.

The grantor will also be able to receive a scope of how many organizations will be applying for the grant, and to prepare enough staff to review future grant proposals that will be submitted.

Remember that an LOI is your chance to create a good first impression for the funder. So be sure to follow all these steps for a successful LOI.

How to Write an LOI

Guidelines

Most grantors will provide you with guidelines of what they want in the LOI – these guidelines must be followed. Negligence to the guidelines will land your letter in the reject pile.

Summary

An LOI must be brief and engaging; it should summarize your grant proposal. At times, an LOI can be as long as 3 pages. Although this is not your grant proposal, so keep the letter clear and concise as to not bore the readers.

Business letter

Your LOI must follow a business letter structure. Be sure to use a business letterhead. Your company’s address should appear on the right-hand side and your recipient’s address needs to be on the left-hand side.

Since the LOI is written in a business letter style, you must write in a professional manner. It is best to avoid any general terminology to address the recipient.

Introduction

The opening part of your letter must be eye-catching as it is the first section that the grantor will be reading! It must be concise and engaging, so the reader is enticed to read further.

In your introduction, you must include your company’s name, the grant you are applying for, how much funding you are requesting, and a short summary of the project you need the money for.

It is extremely important to do your research on the funding source, so you can understand how to best appeal to the grantor. This will allow you to include how your specific project fits the funder’s interests and guidelines.

Programs and Objectives

After you have completed writing your opening on your LOI, write a brief summary of the history of your programs. The programs that you currently provide must align with the initiatives you seek to accomplish with the funding. 

Additionally, include a description of your target population and geographic area.

Make sure to elaborate on your objectives. It is essential to incorporate specifics, such as statistics, names of the programs, the program staff, etc.

Funding

Explain if you have received funding from any other sources and how much.  Be sure to mention any other grants that you have applied for.

Signing the LOI

Make sure to thank the funder for the opportunity to send in a letter of intent and to potentially apply for the grant. When signing the letter, use proper business salutations such as “respectfully” or “sincerely”.

There is an option to attach any additional forms to the LOI, but it is not necessary as this is not the grant proposal.

Review

Review the letter before submitting it. Check for proper spelling and grammar, factual mistakes, and that all guidelines were met. Make sure that what you have written in your letter of intent gives off the best impression of your organization!

Submit the LOI

Once your letter has been reviewed, submit your LOI to the funding source. Then you may wait for a message from the funder, through the post or email as to whether or not you have been accepted to submit a grant proposal to the grantor.

How To Break Into The Grant Writing Field

Assess Yourself

If you are used to creative writing – get ready to enter a whole new field of writing. Grant Writing is challenging; It is extremely detail-oriented, analytical, factual, and technical. 

If you are a writer that generally procrastinates and fluffs up your work, grant writing is not the proper specialty for you. As grants must be written clearly and concisely. In addition to this, a grant writer must meet deadlines and work in an efficient manner to do so.

Further, grants require a lot of research and study – to create a grant proposal that includes correct information and that appeals to the grantor.

Make sure that grant writing is the right field for you before you commit to the work it will entail.

Learn about grant writing

There are many resources and classes you can take to learn about grant writing. In addition to this, there are many articles written that will help you learn more about grant writing, such as the Basic Steps Of The Grant Writing Process, 8 Success Habits of Top Grant Writers, and
How to Write A Winning LOI (Letter of Intent)

Moreover, many colleges offer a certificate program and/or classes in grant writing. There are also many books available that can provide you with essential grant writing information, such as The Only Grant Writing Book You’ll Ever Need.

Practice!

Firstly, subscribe to a grants database, such as GrantWatch. Allowing you to have the ability to view grants from all over the USA and from international countries.

Look over many grant proposal requirements and familiarize yourself with what is needed in a grant application. Remember, that grants are not only available to nonprofits, but for businesses and individuals too.

Write your first grant proposal. If you do not know of any organization or company that is willing to have you write a grant for them, it is perfectly ok to write a grant for yourself. 

Build your portfolio

To become a reliable and experienced grant writer, you must be able to show your accomplishments.

Try to find as many grant writing jobs as you can, even if you are working for free or for $10 an hour – consider these projects to be an internship job. You need the experience to take on bigger projects and to expect better payment.

In order to develop a clientele, build your network in the nonprofit community. 

You can also work for other grant writers to help them develop grant proposals for their clients. Moreover, you may learn a lot about grant writing from a professional that is experienced in this field!

Work as a professional and experienced grant writer

Once you have boosted your skills and have built your portfolio – you will be able to show your experience to potential clients. 

You can either do freelance work or work for a specific organization, as many nonprofits have a grant writer employed on their team.

Further, GrantWriterTeam can connect you with many different clients and will give you the ability to take on many grant writing projects

On GrantWriterTeam, you can create your own fees and be paid for your work.

Make sure to take on grant writing projects that you are passionate about – It is a great feeling to help nonprofits and for-profits see their dreams come true!

The Process of Hiring a Grant Writer on GrantWriterTeam

Step 1: Submit a grant writer request

Submit a request for a grant writer on GrantWriterTeam. In your grant writer’s request, you will need to include your primary purpose for hiring a grant writer, your funding/dollar needs, grants you are requesting to be written, etc. Make sure to include all necessary information so that your request will give the grant writers an understanding of what your project consists of. If your request is incomplete, you may need to revise it.

There is a $50 administrative fee for the submission of your request. Once your grant writer request is complete and paid for, GrantWriterTeam will publish your request on our Grant Writing Projects list and send your request to highly skilled and experienced professional grant writers.

Step 2: Receive bids on your request

The grant writers will respond with bids for your project, with their experience, expertise, a list of awarded grants, and writing samples.

They will also include their pricing structure. Grant writing fees vary according to the grant writer’s experience and expertise and the economy of the location where the grant writer resides. Grant writers set their own hourly fees, ranging from $40 an hour and up, for research, writing, and curriculum development. 

If you request a specific grant to be written, the bid will include a flat-rate fee for that grant, so you will be able to know how much the grant writer will charge for the entirety of the grant writing work for each grant requested in your project.

Step 3: Accept a bid

After you accept a bid– the grant writer will be given your contact information and will phone or email you. 

Step 4: Prepare a contract

Together you and the grant writer will be able to set up an online contract for your project, which consists of a retainer and a series of deliverables. With the contract, before you approve, you will be able to review the grant writer’s full resume and two references.

Step 5: Approve the contract

Once the contract is submitted to you for approval, you may request changes to be made to your contract. When the contract is approved, you need to pay the agreed-upon retainer and your grant writer will then start your project. Once each deliverable is complete, your grant writer will upload the completed work – requiring payment for the deliverable, and then you will be able to view the file(s) uploaded.

Step 6: Add more work needed

Would you like to work with your grant writer after all deliverables are complete? Simply ask your grant writer to add a new deliverable. You will then have to approve the newly added deliverables because they were not approved when you originally approved the contract. The grant writer can then proceed as usual and upload a file of completed work once each deliverable is completed.

Contact us

We at GrantWriterTeam are here to help you! If you have any questions regarding your process with GrantWriterTeam, email us at Support@GrantWriterTeam.com.

Grant Writer’s Guide on How to Keep Your Clients Happy:

Grant writing is a service, and like all services, we want the client to be satisfied and happy. This is important as it can lead to a long-term relationship with your clients and thus, they can bring in more projects and more work for you. 

Furthermore, it can alleviate much of the grant writing stress. An upset client can ruin a project. It may mean payment will not be made on time, the client may opt-out and hire a new grant writer, etc. Hence, it is crucial to ensure that your client is satisfied and happy.

Communication

Communication is key to every relationship. The same goes for a relationship between a grant writer and his/her client. When speaking to your client, make sure that you are clear and understood. You do not want the client dissatisfied with your work because he/she wanted something else to be done or did not understand the procedure.

Further, make sure to contact your client right away when a bid is accepted or when the grant seeker hires you. This presents a level of professionalism and responsibility – that you are reaching out to the client immediately. This will be much appreciated by your client.

Always respond to emails and phone calls. Do not leave your client wondering what is going on with the project; this can lead to much frustration and confusion. If you are unavailable at the time, respond to the email or call and let your client know that you are unavailable and will respond or call back in a certain time frame. 

In addition to this, update your client constantly so that your client is aware of what is going on with the project, what work is being done, what is needed, when to pay, etc.

Collect documents

Be sure to collect all documents necessary from the client. No one is happy when the client is scrambling for paperwork the date of the grantor’s deadline!

Transparency

Be transparent with all your work for your grant writer.

Create a contract with a series of deliverables (similar to GrantWriterTeam’s contract template), so that the client knows clearly what date the work will be completed. This will also help you complete the project in a timely fashion.

Moreover, make sure that each deliverable is clear as to what work will be delivered. So that the client is aware of the process and the work before signing the contract. If any confusion occurs, you can always point the client to the contract that he/she signed.

When submitting a draft to the client in your deliverable, be sure to label it as a draft – so that the client does not get upset from errors that may appear.

Professionalism

Always keep a professional decorum so that the client is ensured that they are in good hands. You need the client to trust your work and believe that you will provide excellent work to them.

Check your spelling and grammar for anything that you send to your client. You must maintain a professional persona in any of your emails, letters, and conversations with the client. If your emails have errors, the client may think that your grant writing work will have errors.

If any mistakes are made, take responsibility for it, and happily fix your errors. If the client does not like something that is written – edit it, instead of not acknowledging their request because you believe that you know better.  Many grant writers seek to create the best proposal to get the grant awarded. Since the client is paying you for your work, their requests must be completed accordingly.

Create a long-term relationship

Thank your client for working with them and let them know that you are available for any further work that may be needed in the future. If your client is happy, chances are that he/she will contact you if he/she needs grant writing services again.

GrantWriterTeam allows you to work for many different clients, and to build long-term relationships. Deliverables can always be added to a contract. We also seek to ensure that all of our grant writers and their clients are happy with the work completed and the process. We check in on our clients at times to ask how satisfied and happy they are with their grant writer’s work and process of things.

How to Optimize Your Resume as a Writer

Introduction

Writer CVs are a peculiar thing. Usually, people try to land their dream jobs by emphasizing their achievements in their resume. Then, HR staff and recruiters read through this and decide whether or not they want to meet the candidate. With writers, it’s a bit different – your resume is, at the same time, a piece of your portfolio. You will not only be judged by your work experience and skills (as is the case in other industries) but the very writing style of your CV.

That’s why we have prepared this guide to the tricky realm of resume writing for writers. Let’s have a look at how you can craft the best possible CV!

Make it text-dominant

The usual piece of advice when it comes to CV writing is to keep it short, succinct, and visual. Many people use CV templates and diagrams to say as much as they can visually and not waste too many words. The reason for this is to grab the attention of the reader (HR manager) and stand out from other prospective candidates.

This is one of the main differences between a regular resume and that of a writer. As a writer, you should use text as a tool and a weapon, and not resort to the attraction tricks of visual elements. Being able to capture the attention of your reader using pure text says a lot about your writing abilities.

Make it readable

At the same time, text-heavy pieces need to be organized and neatly structured. Another peculiarity in this sense is that you would usually use bullet points, lists and short sentences to get your point across. In a writer CV, it’s different. You want to show that you can tackle „long stories“ without resorting to lists or similar elements.

Still, there are many tricks that you can use to achieve that. For example, you should make your paragraphs shorter and make a beginning indent in each – this makes the readability higher for the person checking your CV. You can also split different sections under different headings and give them interesting names.

Hire experts

Many writers use paper writing services to help them craft the perfect CV. It seems counter-intuitive to hire someone else to do it for you, but you can usually get clearer insights into your CV from a different perspective.

You can also use the Grant Writer service for your resume needs. Writers on this service usually craft grant proposals, so they are knowledgeable in fixed-structure work that aims to impress the reader and present the subject in the best possible light.

Flaunt your creativity

Employers who are on the lookout for writers are usually searching for someone who can think outside of the box. In other words, you need to show that you know how to view and observe things from an unusual angle and make the reader think.

A resume (or your motivational letter) is the perfect chance to take a fixed, rigid structure that’s prone to clichés and corny phrases and make it completely your own. For example, if you like using humor or cynicism, you can even make a slight parody of the CV form.

Emphasize your strengths

When you continue with the hiring process, it’s the company’s turn to impress you with amazing employee experience. However, whether you like it or not, the CV is considered your turn to impress the employer. You won’t get too far by being too shy and humble, unfortunately. No matter how you usually approach your work and your stance on bragging, it’s actually the perfect time to do so in your resume.

Think about what the employer or client could gain from having you in their writing team, that they can hardly find in other writers. When you think about this, put yourself in their shoes. If you feel like your client would prefer speed to creativity, present that you are able to write very quickly (of course, only if you really are).

Refer readers to your portfolio

With every writer job application you submit, it is always best that you add a portfolio of writing samples you are most proud of. You should also emphasize that readers of your CV can see examples of your actual writing in the samples that you have enclosed. Unfortunately, the resume itself can sometimes divert too much attention from what really matters. If you are lucky, recruiters will be looking at your work first, and then the resume. However, it’s often the other way around.

Avoid clichés and buzzwords

This is a piece of advice that can be applied to any resume, but it’s infinitely more important for the CV of a professional writer. When you add cliché phrases to your CV, it is like you are instantly demonstrating a lack of skills to express yourself in an original way. This may be acceptable in a job application for a data scientist where other skills take centre place, but it should be absolutely avoided in a writer’s resume.

The sneaky thing about clichés and buzzwords is that you can start using them without actually becoming aware of it. They can even slip under your radar after you’ve read your CV several times. That’s why it’s a good idea to run it through writing checkers like Grammarly or ProWritingAid that will underline cliché phrases. 

Conclusion

A writers’ resume is important, but you should also emphasize your portfolio and writing samples. In most cases, employers and potential clients will focus more on these than the resume itself. That said, it is still important to make sure your CV is high-quality, especially when it comes to correctness. In writer resumes, there is zero-tolerance for mistakes. 

Dorian Martin is a professional writer working with the best dissertation service for PhD students. He helps students around the world submit high-quality, innovative work on time. Dorian is especially interested in the fields of HR and psychology.

What Nonprofit Start-Ups Need Before Hiring a Grant Writer

Many new nonprofits seek funding at the beginning of their journey. However, some grants require specifics that your nonprofit organization may not be ready for.

Many Nonprofit start-ups hire grant writers without the proper funding and proper paperwork for their project. This may result in a waste of time and money. To prevent this from happening, ensure that you are actually ready to hire a grant writer. 

These are some things that nonprofits need before hiring a grant writer.

Stable Funding: Before applying for a grant, make sure that you have the proper funding to prove to the grantor that you are a worthwhile investment. Foundations do not want to grant funding to nonprofits that will fold. Many grantors require an outline of your budget in your application.

Further, grant writers do not work based on commission. Your nonprofit must have the proper funding to pay the grant writer before any award from the funding source is granted. If you tell the grant writer that you only have $200 for your project; there is not much work the grant writer can do for you. Moreover, grant writers will not agree to take on a project that only involves grant research because that is all your organization can afford.

Crowdfunding is a great way to gain funding for your organization before hiring a grant writer. YouHelp is the perfect platform in which you can create a fundraising campaign for your nonprofit start-up.

Accomplishments: When grantors view applications, they want to award the organization that most qualifies to win the grant money. You must be able to prove to the grantor that you are worthy of receiving the funding. In order to do so, make sure that you have made some accomplishments that you can put in your grant proposal.

Clear Direction: If you are unclear as to what your organization stands for or specializes in, you are not ready to hire a grant writer. You need to have a plan as to what your organization programs are/will be, what you stand for, what you need the funding for, etc. Grant writers expect to receive clear information from you. Without the proper direction and organization, the grant research and/or grant writing process can become a difficult maze.

Moreover, to apply for a grant, you need to be clear in your direction. Your grant proposal must be concise and understandable. If you don’t know the details of your own nonprofit, how will your grant writer prepare the grant proposal for you? Grantors award their funds to organizations that have a clear plan and goal. As said before, they want to make sure you are a worthwhile investment.

So before hiring a grant writer, make sure to have a clear, focused, and organized plan for your nonprofit organization.

Paperwork: Grants are extremely detailed oriented and require a lot of planning. The funding source may require some legal and financial paperwork (IRS 501C3, tax return, etc.) to authenticate that you are a liable organization and meet their qualifications. It is frustrating for a grant writer to constantly ask for details and paperwork that are needed for the grant. This is time-consuming and will cost you a lot of money.

Look at examples of grant applications, so that you can see what information you need so that it is available for the grant writer immediately. 

Make sure you have all information ready before you hire a grant writer. So that your grant writer will have to work fewer hours on your project and the process will be smooth and quick.

When you are ready to hire a grant writer

When you have stable funding, some accomplishments, a clear direction, and have collected the necessary paperwork for your project; you may hire a grant writer. GrantWriterTeam has many experienced grant writers that can take on your project today!

7 Mistakes Nonprofits Make When Hiring a Grant Writer

Grant writing is a job suitable for a meticulous and skillful individual. Hiring a professional grant writer is one of the most significant investments a nonprofit organization can make. The right hire ensures that the organization never runs out of funds.

Your grant writer should capture the entire story of your organization in a concise and definite manner. They also need to have an excellent team spirit by cooperating with multiple stakeholders and working within the indicated timeframe always. Hiring a grant writer is undoubtedly no child’s play and should not be taken lightly.

It is noteworthy that grant writers not only ensure proper and continuous funding of your nonprofit. They also build secure long-lasting connections with funders for your organization.

Separating writers who had their resumes put together for them from individuals who genuinely have the copywriting skills to secure your grant can be very tricky. Any poor writing could stop your funding or even jeopardize your organization’s reputation.

Nonprofits overlook some vital information when hiring grant writers. Here are some mistakes they make:

  1. Unclear Mission and Objectives:
    The first thing to consider when hiring grant writers is your mission and objectives. The main reason nonprofits hire grant writers is to enhance their work. If your project or organization’s objectives are unclear, the writer won’t capture the project goals effectively or add details that would convince sponsors to disburse the grant.

    An organization without the right objectives or mission cannot hire the right person or position the grant writer for success. Unfortunately, some nonprofits don’t consider this. Their unclear objectives result in:

    HIRING THE WRONG WRITER – Without the right objectives, you can’t guarantee that a writer is suitable for the role. You may hire an individual for the wrong reasons or not be able to test potential hires for the specifics of the project appropriately.

    LACK OF A STRUCTURED HIRING PROCESS – Finding the right grant writer doesn’t happen immediately. However, unclear objectives could delay the hiring process. Since the project mission and goals aren’t clear, it would take longer to put the project details together. In the end, the nonprofit would have to meet deadlines or complete the project within the stipulated timeline.

    Therefore, they prioritize speed over quality because they’re under pressure to fill the role as soon as possible. They might end up skipping essential steps in the hiring process or hire the first candidate that seems without making sure that the individual can execute the job properly.

    Before hiring a grant writer, nonprofits ought to ask for updated resumes. A resume shows you if your prospect is as skillful as they claim. An outdated resume lacks a history of past feats achieved and sample grants from recent jobs that were successfully funded. You’d also need to ask for references from three clients the writer has worked with.
  2. Accepting an Outdated Resume:
    Before hiring a grant writer, nonprofits ought to ask for updated resumes. A resume shows you if your prospect is as skillful as they claim. An outdated resume lacks a history of past feats achieved and sample grants from recent jobs that were successfully funded. You’d also need to ask for references from three clients the writer has worked with. Nonprofits end up skipping this essential step by allowing outdated resumes that don’t capture the individual’s skills Nonprofits end up skipping this essential step by allowing outdated resumes that don’t capture the individual’s skills.
  3. Cutting Costs:
    Most times, the promised remuneration could determine the quality of a job. The amount of salary you budget for the job post can go a long way in choosing qualified candidates who know vital grant writing techniques.

    Specific nonprofits estimate way too low for salaries of grant writers. Therefore, they settle for just rookie grant writers who would do the job at a lesser price. This action jeopardizes the quality and success of the job.

    Some organizations try to spend the least amount of money possible on every project. In the bid to cut costs, they discard skilled and experienced consultants for less qualified individuals.

    The proposal is crucial to securing the grant. Discarding skilled individuals for less qualified writers won’t give you the chance to get the proposal that could secure the grant.
  4. Overlooking Evidence of Past Success:
    Evidence of prior success refers to the previous jobs done by the prospective grant writers and how they ensured the organization’s funding. To get this information, you need to call the three clients (references) listed in the candidate’s resume.

    Getting honest essay writing service reviews of the candidate from these previous clients might be tough because they won’t want to tamper with the individual’s chances. Therefore, ask questions about the point(s) they feel the candidate could improve on. Also, ask the candidate about their previous work experience. Any negative comment about former clients is a big no-no, you shouldn’t hire such a grant writer.

    Some nonprofits don’t want to go through this seemingly rigorous task and thus hire grant writers without getting a review from previous clients.
  5. Hiring Candidates Who Lack Team Spirit:
    Every grant writer you hire should be able to work with other stakeholders and have a good relationship with funders. One way to discover a lack of team spirit in a potential hire is to listen to what they say during the interview. Be wary of candidates who keep emphasizing how they can work alone even when you suggest putting them in a team; it’s a red flag.

    Every grant is about having a team.
    A full team of grant writers consists of a grant manager whose job is to supervise the whole group, a project monitoring and evaluating officer, a procurement officer, and a project finance officer. Additionally, there can be technical officers in charge of the e-mails and a communication officer for publicity.

    There should be synergy between everyone in the team to ensure efficiency. Nonprofits trying to save costs end up hiring a few hands consisting of loners with a low level of expertise.
  6. Lack of Consideration for Organizational Skills:
    Candidates with organizational skills should have a work plan and project development objectives. Potential hires should tell you how they can meet up with deadlines and ask how they would handle the situation if they ever missed a deadline.

    However, most nonprofits don’t put the organizational skills of candidates into consideration. Therefore, they overlook it during the hiring process. This action could lead to hiring the wrong grant writer.
  7. Hiring Candidates Who Lack Passion:
    A candidate’s personality can go a long way in letting you know how passionate they are about the job. Most nonprofits focus solely on the candidate’s experience and skills, failing to recognize that character and attitude are also important. The grant writer’s personality should match the company’s culture.

    Additionally, serious candidates who look forward to your nonprofit’s success should ask questions about your projects. It showcases their passion. Passion is often overlooked during the interview stage, leading to employing writers that are unsuitable for the job.

    You may want to conduct a personality test so you can hire the right grant writer. As an NGO, you wouldn’t want your proposal only to show facts and figures. It should relate to humanity and appeal to emotions to depict the NGO’s real culture and identity.

Conclusion

For your nonprofit organization to make headway and never run bankrupt, it’s imperative to avoid these mistakes so you’d get a grant writer whose proposal attracts funds.