Writing For A Cause: Happy National First Responders Day

National First Responders Day

Today is National First Responders Day. We celebrate this day to give back to our heroes that have given up so much for us! We honor our firefighters, police officers, EMT’s, and lifeguards. 

We want to dedicate this article in memory of Dr. Sam Law, a cousin of Althea,our Director of Marketing at GrantWatch.

Althea says of Sam, “He was the best ‘big brother ever’, he was on the ‘front lines’ helping COVID patients. He lost his life battling Covid-19.

He was doing what he loved. RIP.”

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The pandemic has led to a drastic need for specialized equipment and programs for our first responders. Many EMT’s put their lives on the line to save those that were severely sick from COVID-19. 

EMT’s choose to take risks to save those that are affected by the horrific virus. Our first responders work in very stressful conditions and need the highest level of protection. To date, we also know that exposure, stress, pre-existing conditions, and vitamin deficiencies contribute greatly to susceptibility. 

Not only must we give our greatest gratitude to our first responders, but we need to find the funding to provide the resources needed for first responders.

Without them, people would not be receiving the help they need, and we would see many more deaths, whether from sickness, crime, fires, etc.

On GrantWriterTeam, there is a nonprofit organization that is seeking to hire a grant writer to provide resources for first responders suffering from PTSD

Police, firefighters, and emergency medical personnel pay a high price due to their high-stress careers. Many of these people working high-stress occupations endure mental health issues such as PTSD, as a result of the horrific sites that they have seen on the job. 

As a grant writer, you have the privilege to make a difference in the world, and help those that are in need, such as our brave first responders.

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Photo by Kamaji Ogino on Pexels.com

Writing for a Cause

Grant Writing is not creative writing or blog writing. When writing a grant, you are writing to secure the appropriate funding for a specific cause. 

Nonprofit organizations turn to grants to fund their programs and services – to help those in need.

Each nonprofit organization is created based on a mission and a vision. As a grant writer, you must present the passion of their vision.

Grant writing is a rewarding job, as you are helping organizations provide much needed services for individuals and communities. You are writing for a cause, that has meaning to people’s lives!

Tips for Writing the Grant

To win the grant for your client, you must understand the cause for which the organization is fighting for. Their passion for their vision must be your passion, and your writing should resonate the intense need for the cause. 

Make sure to include facts in your grant proposal to prove why the organization’s cause is important and needed. Include statistics and specifics to prove your case, so that you can persuade the grantor to believe your mission.

Moreover, explain how the nonprofit’s programs and services will help serve the cause. 

By using GrantWatch.com, you can find grants for funding for the needs of first responders to help serve their cause.  GrantWatch has many categories of grants, such as community services, domestic violence, veterans, health and medical, etc. Allowing you to search for grants in an efficient manner.

To take on our grant writing projects and write for a cause, join our team of grant writers!

All the hard work of grant writing will pay off when you help an organization see their dreams and your dreams come to fruition! 

To all the first responders and the families of first responders, we at GrantWatch thank you and express our gratitude through our continued search for funding for your agencies. RIP, Dr. Sam Law.

What Is An LOI And How To Write One

Letter Of Intent

What is an LOI

An LOI is a letter of intent/inquiry: Many Grantors will request an LOI as an initial letter before a grant proposal is submitted. Based on your letter of intent, the funding source will make the decision whether or not to accept a grant proposal from you. This way, the grantor can easily evaluate which organizations they feel are most viable to be considered for the award.

The grantor will also be able to receive a scope of how many organizations will be applying for the grant, and to prepare enough staff to review future grant proposals that will be submitted.

Remember that an LOI is your chance to create a good first impression for the funder. So be sure to follow all these steps for a successful LOI.

How to Write an LOI

Guidelines

Most grantors will provide you with guidelines of what they want in the LOI – these guidelines must be followed. Negligence to the guidelines will land your letter in the reject pile.

Summary

An LOI must be brief and engaging; it should summarize your grant proposal. At times, an LOI can be as long as 3 pages. Although this is not your grant proposal, so keep the letter clear and concise as to not bore the readers.

Business letter

Your LOI must follow a business letter structure. Be sure to use a business letterhead. Your company’s address should appear on the right-hand side and your recipient’s address needs to be on the left-hand side.

Since the LOI is written in a business letter style, you must write in a professional manner. It is best to avoid any general terminology to address the recipient.

Introduction

The opening part of your letter must be eye-catching as it is the first section that the grantor will be reading! It must be concise and engaging, so the reader is enticed to read further.

In your introduction, you must include your company’s name, the grant you are applying for, how much funding you are requesting, and a short summary of the project you need the money for.

It is extremely important to do your research on the funding source, so you can understand how to best appeal to the grantor. This will allow you to include how your specific project fits the funder’s interests and guidelines.

Programs and Objectives

After you have completed writing your opening on your LOI, write a brief summary of the history of your programs. The programs that you currently provide must align with the initiatives you seek to accomplish with the funding. 

Additionally, include a description of your target population and geographic area.

Make sure to elaborate on your objectives. It is essential to incorporate specifics, such as statistics, names of the programs, the program staff, etc.

Funding

Explain if you have received funding from any other sources and how much.  Be sure to mention any other grants that you have applied for.

Signing the LOI

Make sure to thank the funder for the opportunity to send in a letter of intent and to potentially apply for the grant. When signing the letter, use proper business salutations such as “respectfully” or “sincerely”.

There is an option to attach any additional forms to the LOI, but it is not necessary as this is not the grant proposal.

Review

Review the letter before submitting it. Check for proper spelling and grammar, factual mistakes, and that all guidelines were met. Make sure that what you have written in your letter of intent gives off the best impression of your organization!

Submit the LOI

Once your letter has been reviewed, submit your LOI to the funding source. Then you may wait for a message from the funder, through the post or email as to whether or not you have been accepted to submit a grant proposal to the grantor.

How To Break Into The Grant Writing Field

Assess Yourself

If you are used to creative writing – get ready to enter a whole new field of writing. Grant Writing is challenging; It is extremely detail-oriented, analytical, factual, and technical. 

If you are a writer that generally procrastinates and fluffs up your work, grant writing is not the proper specialty for you. As grants must be written clearly and concisely. In addition to this, a grant writer must meet deadlines and work in an efficient manner to do so.

Further, grants require a lot of research and study – to create a grant proposal that includes correct information and that appeals to the grantor.

Make sure that grant writing is the right field for you before you commit to the work it will entail.

Learn about grant writing

There are many resources and classes you can take to learn about grant writing. In addition to this, there are many articles written that will help you learn more about grant writing, such as the Basic Steps Of The Grant Writing Process, 8 Success Habits of Top Grant Writers, and
How to Write A Winning LOI (Letter of Intent)

Moreover, many colleges offer a certificate program and/or classes in grant writing. There are also many books available that can provide you with essential grant writing information, such as The Only Grant Writing Book You’ll Ever Need.

Practice!

Firstly, subscribe to a grants database, such as GrantWatch. Allowing you to have the ability to view grants from all over the USA and from international countries.

Look over many grant proposal requirements and familiarize yourself with what is needed in a grant application. Remember, that grants are not only available to nonprofits, but for businesses and individuals too.

Write your first grant proposal. If you do not know of any organization or company that is willing to have you write a grant for them, it is perfectly ok to write a grant for yourself. 

Build your portfolio

To become a reliable and experienced grant writer, you must be able to show your accomplishments.

Try to find as many grant writing jobs as you can, even if you are working for free or for $10 an hour – consider these projects to be an internship job. You need the experience to take on bigger projects and to expect better payment.

In order to develop a clientele, build your network in the nonprofit community. 

You can also work for other grant writers to help them develop grant proposals for their clients. Moreover, you may learn a lot about grant writing from a professional that is experienced in this field!

Work as a professional and experienced grant writer

Once you have boosted your skills and have built your portfolio – you will be able to show your experience to potential clients. 

You can either do freelance work or work for a specific organization, as many nonprofits have a grant writer employed on their team.

Further, GrantWriterTeam can connect you with many different clients and will give you the ability to take on many grant writing projects

On GrantWriterTeam, you can create your own fees and be paid for your work.

Make sure to take on grant writing projects that you are passionate about – It is a great feeling to help nonprofits and for-profits see their dreams come true!

The Process of Hiring a Grant Writer on GrantWriterTeam

Step 1: Submit a grant writer request

Submit a request for a grant writer on GrantWriterTeam. In your grant writer’s request, you will need to include your primary purpose for hiring a grant writer, your funding/dollar needs, grants you are requesting to be written, etc. Make sure to include all necessary information so that your request will give the grant writers an understanding of what your project consists of. If your request is incomplete, you may need to revise it.

There is a $50 administrative fee for the submission of your request. Once your grant writer request is complete and paid for, GrantWriterTeam will publish your request on our Grant Writing Projects list and send your request to highly skilled and experienced professional grant writers.

Step 2: Receive bids on your request

The grant writers will respond with bids for your project, with their experience, expertise, a list of awarded grants, and writing samples.

They will also include their pricing structure. Grant writing fees vary according to the grant writer’s experience and expertise and the economy of the location where the grant writer resides. Grant writers set their own hourly fees, ranging from $40 an hour and up, for research, writing, and curriculum development. 

If you request a specific grant to be written, the bid will include a flat-rate fee for that grant, so you will be able to know how much the grant writer will charge for the entirety of the grant writing work for each grant requested in your project.

Step 3: Accept a bid

After you accept a bid– the grant writer will be given your contact information and will phone or email you. 

Step 4: Prepare a contract

Together you and the grant writer will be able to set up an online contract for your project, which consists of a retainer and a series of deliverables. With the contract, before you approve, you will be able to review the grant writer’s full resume and two references.

Step 5: Approve the contract

Once the contract is submitted to you for approval, you may request changes to be made to your contract. When the contract is approved, you need to pay the agreed-upon retainer and your grant writer will then start your project. Once each deliverable is complete, your grant writer will upload the completed work – requiring payment for the deliverable, and then you will be able to view the file(s) uploaded.

Step 6: Add more work needed

Would you like to work with your grant writer after all deliverables are complete? Simply ask your grant writer to add a new deliverable. You will then have to approve the newly added deliverables because they were not approved when you originally approved the contract. The grant writer can then proceed as usual and upload a file of completed work once each deliverable is completed.

Contact us

We at GrantWriterTeam are here to help you! If you have any questions regarding your process with GrantWriterTeam, email us at Support@GrantWriterTeam.com.