7 Mistakes Nonprofits Make When Hiring a Grant Writer

Grant writing is a job suitable for a meticulous and skillful individual. Hiring a professional grant writer is one of the most significant investments a nonprofit organization can make. The right hire ensures that the organization never runs out of funds.

Your grant writer should capture the entire story of your organization in a concise and definite manner. They also need to have an excellent team spirit by cooperating with multiple stakeholders and working within the indicated timeframe always. Hiring a grant writer is undoubtedly no child’s play and should not be taken lightly.

It is noteworthy that grant writers not only ensure proper and continuous funding of your nonprofit. They also build secure long-lasting connections with funders for your organization.

Separating writers who had their resumes put together for them from individuals who genuinely have the copywriting skills to secure your grant can be very tricky. Any poor writing could stop your funding or even jeopardize your organization’s reputation.

Nonprofits overlook some vital information when hiring grant writers. Here are some mistakes they make:

  1. Unclear Mission and Objectives:
    The first thing to consider when hiring grant writers is your mission and objectives. The main reason nonprofits hire grant writers is to enhance their work. If your project or organization’s objectives are unclear, the writer won’t capture the project goals effectively or add details that would convince sponsors to disburse the grant.

    An organization without the right objectives or mission cannot hire the right person or position the grant writer for success. Unfortunately, some nonprofits don’t consider this. Their unclear objectives result in:

    HIRING THE WRONG WRITER – Without the right objectives, you can’t guarantee that a writer is suitable for the role. You may hire an individual for the wrong reasons or not be able to test potential hires for the specifics of the project appropriately.

    LACK OF A STRUCTURED HIRING PROCESS – Finding the right grant writer doesn’t happen immediately. However, unclear objectives could delay the hiring process. Since the project mission and goals aren’t clear, it would take longer to put the project details together. In the end, the nonprofit would have to meet deadlines or complete the project within the stipulated timeline.

    Therefore, they prioritize speed over quality because they’re under pressure to fill the role as soon as possible. They might end up skipping essential steps in the hiring process or hire the first candidate that seems without making sure that the individual can execute the job properly.

    Before hiring a grant writer, nonprofits ought to ask for updated resumes. A resume shows you if your prospect is as skillful as they claim. An outdated resume lacks a history of past feats achieved and sample grants from recent jobs that were successfully funded. You’d also need to ask for references from three clients the writer has worked with.
  2. Accepting an Outdated Resume:
    Before hiring a grant writer, nonprofits ought to ask for updated resumes. A resume shows you if your prospect is as skillful as they claim. An outdated resume lacks a history of past feats achieved and sample grants from recent jobs that were successfully funded. You’d also need to ask for references from three clients the writer has worked with. Nonprofits end up skipping this essential step by allowing outdated resumes that don’t capture the individual’s skills Nonprofits end up skipping this essential step by allowing outdated resumes that don’t capture the individual’s skills.
  3. Cutting Costs:
    Most times, the promised remuneration could determine the quality of a job. The amount of salary you budget for the job post can go a long way in choosing qualified candidates who know vital grant writing techniques.

    Specific nonprofits estimate way too low for salaries of grant writers. Therefore, they settle for just rookie grant writers who would do the job at a lesser price. This action jeopardizes the quality and success of the job.

    Some organizations try to spend the least amount of money possible on every project. In the bid to cut costs, they discard skilled and experienced consultants for less qualified individuals.

    The proposal is crucial to securing the grant. Discarding skilled individuals for less qualified writers won’t give you the chance to get the proposal that could secure the grant.
  4. Overlooking Evidence of Past Success:
    Evidence of prior success refers to the previous jobs done by the prospective grant writers and how they ensured the organization’s funding. To get this information, you need to call the three clients (references) listed in the candidate’s resume.

    Getting honest essay writing service reviews of the candidate from these previous clients might be tough because they won’t want to tamper with the individual’s chances. Therefore, ask questions about the point(s) they feel the candidate could improve on. Also, ask the candidate about their previous work experience. Any negative comment about former clients is a big no-no, you shouldn’t hire such a grant writer.

    Some nonprofits don’t want to go through this seemingly rigorous task and thus hire grant writers without getting a review from previous clients.
  5. Hiring Candidates Who Lack Team Spirit:
    Every grant writer you hire should be able to work with other stakeholders and have a good relationship with funders. One way to discover a lack of team spirit in a potential hire is to listen to what they say during the interview. Be wary of candidates who keep emphasizing how they can work alone even when you suggest putting them in a team; it’s a red flag.

    Every grant is about having a team.
    A full team of grant writers consists of a grant manager whose job is to supervise the whole group, a project monitoring and evaluating officer, a procurement officer, and a project finance officer. Additionally, there can be technical officers in charge of the e-mails and a communication officer for publicity.

    There should be synergy between everyone in the team to ensure efficiency. Nonprofits trying to save costs end up hiring a few hands consisting of loners with a low level of expertise.
  6. Lack of Consideration for Organizational Skills:
    Candidates with organizational skills should have a work plan and project development objectives. Potential hires should tell you how they can meet up with deadlines and ask how they would handle the situation if they ever missed a deadline.

    However, most nonprofits don’t put the organizational skills of candidates into consideration. Therefore, they overlook it during the hiring process. This action could lead to hiring the wrong grant writer.
  7. Hiring Candidates Who Lack Passion:
    A candidate’s personality can go a long way in letting you know how passionate they are about the job. Most nonprofits focus solely on the candidate’s experience and skills, failing to recognize that character and attitude are also important. The grant writer’s personality should match the company’s culture.

    Additionally, serious candidates who look forward to your nonprofit’s success should ask questions about your projects. It showcases their passion. Passion is often overlooked during the interview stage, leading to employing writers that are unsuitable for the job.

    You may want to conduct a personality test so you can hire the right grant writer. As an NGO, you wouldn’t want your proposal only to show facts and figures. It should relate to humanity and appeal to emotions to depict the NGO’s real culture and identity.

Conclusion

For your nonprofit organization to make headway and never run bankrupt, it’s imperative to avoid these mistakes so you’d get a grant writer whose proposal attracts funds.

Why Nonprofit Organizations Should Hire a Grant Writer

Nonprofit organizations work their best to benefit communities. Since nonprofits do not generate their revenue from their vital services, they seek to gain funding from other resources. 

One of the main methods that nonprofits use for funding is the securing of grants. Grants allow nonprofits to receive the proper funding to continue servicing their communities. Grants are not awarded to those that need it more, but to those who submit the best application. A nonprofit will be awarded a competitive grant if it submits a high-quality grant application. Thus, nonprofits must work to submit the highest quality application that they can. Hence, grant writers are very much needed. 

By hiring a grant writer, nonprofits have a greater chance to be awarded a grant, as their grant proposal will be written by an experienced writer. 

Hiring a grant writer may seem expensive. But, the cost of the job is only a small percentage of the funding a nonprofit can gain from the grant. 

As time is crucial for many grants with a deadline, hiring a grant writer will ensure that the application is written on time. By designating the grant writing job to a professional grant writer, grant writing will be done on time and will allow the nonprofit to be busy with other tasks. Furthermore, every successful grant proposal starts with good research of the grants that can benefit one’s nonprofit organization. 

What can a grant writer do for you?

Grant writers can do the research for you. This can save you time and work. In addition to this, grant writers can write up a curriculum for you. Moreover, grant writers may help a nonprofit by managing their YouHelp page, which is a campaign that will help an organization gain crowdfunding. Many grant writers take on grant writing jobs for a living, so they work hard at improving their writing skills and seek to have the grant awarded for their clients. Many grant writers also support the cause of the nonprofit organization and will then deliver a great grant proposal.  

Hiring a grant writer requires communication. Which may be helpful for a nonprofit. By effectively communicating with the grant writer your program and funding needs, the grant writer will be able to write up an accurate grant proposal. Furthermore, this will help the nonprofit review their analytics and their needs. Thus, your organization can plan what goals need to be refined and develop a focus on what tasks are needed to succeed.

If you work for or own a nonprofit organization, definitely consider hiring a grant writer! 


We have many experienced grant writers onhttps://www.grantwriterteam.com/.

Grant Writing Tips – Nonprofit Organization Edition 💻

Are you getting ready to write a grant for the first time or are experienced but need a little refresher? We have compiled a list of the top 10 grant writing tips, laser-focused for nonprofit organizations. Most nonprofit organizations are able to operate thanks to donations and grants. Being able to write a grant for a nonprofit organization is an in-demand skill that will continue to grow for many years to come.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1) Create a calendar tracking all of the grants

Keep track of all of the grant deadlines in a calendar so that you are always up-to-date. GrantWatch offers a feature that allows you to add grants to your calendar so you can easily keep track of all of the information in one place.

2) Build relationships with grant funders

Many grants are awarded to nonprofit organizations that have relationships with the funders. Build those relationships by contacting the funders and introducing your nonprofit organization. Tell them all about what you do and find common ground to spark conversation. 

3) Use SMART objectives

SMART objectives are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Timely. These SMART objectives are used to measure progress. They need to be very specific of what it is that you wish to accomplish, include some kind of measurement, that measurement must be attainable and realistic, and you must assign a time to attain it by. 

4) Get your nonprofit organization grant ready

Assess the quality of your IRS, grants.gov, and specific state requirements before you start applying for grants. Make sure that the nonprofit organization is at a level that allows them to apply for grants, and specific kinds of grants.

5) Evaluate your impact

After you receive the grant, make sure to evaluate how the grant has impacted the organization by assessing the SMART objectives you created. By assessing the impact, you can see how your organization has progressed and report back to the funders all of the work that you have done.

6) Review the application again

Once you are ready to submit the application, complete one more pre-submission check to assess the grant application to see how well it aligns with the requirements.

7) Learn everything about the grant funders

Research the makers and funders of the grants so that you are aware of everything. Know the deadlines, their grant making history, where the grants are being awarded, and compare to what you are searching for.

8) Acknowldge grant funders after you receive a grant

After receiving a grant, make sure to acknowledge the grant funders by inviting them to an open house, writing them thank you letters, or doing something extra special.

9) Have someone edit your proposal

After you write the proposal, make sure that you have someone else edit the application so they can see things that you might have missed.

10) Create a budget that is consistent with your story

When creating your budget, create it so that it tells the complete story of how you plan on using the money. Include everything that the funds will be used for, including staff and equipment.


Grant Writer Team is a platform for grant seekers and grant writers to come together to work grant applications. New grant writing jobs are being posted daily. If you are a grant writer, continue to check back with us to see if there are jobs that would work with your schedule. Our grant seekers would be greatly appreciative.

About the Author: The author is a staff writer at GrantWriterTeam.com

I Want to Hear Your Story!

In these uncertain times, leaders have managed and created nonprofits for the purpose of addressing issues affecting their communities. Today, on Presidents' Day, we not only honor the presidents who have served this country but also the leaders of nonprofits who've led fights against homelessness, and have advocated for poverty alleviation, improved literacy, developed professional skills, and mentored the next generation. 

Today, Grant News Press is offering leaders the chance to become published writers and tell their stories so others can embrace and mirror their leadership in their own organizations. This is an opportunity for leaders to showcase their knowledge and ability to manage a great organization. Do you have a story to tell of how grant funding provided new opportunities for you, your clients, or community?

Has your organization faced any obstacles? Did grants help? If so, we want to give you an opportunity to showcase your success in overcoming the odds so that others can do the same. Sharing knowledge is the best opportunity to help others grow. Now is your chance to pay if forward!

Click the following link and pitch your article to our editor. The link will then direct you to an article planning form. Once approved, you will have access to write and submit it for publication.  You will have your own byline and an About the Author column generating publicity for you and/or your organization

 

We welcome articles about:

 

  • New trends within the nonprofit community;
  • Grant writing, crowdfunding, and social media tips to share;
  • A model educational initiative;
  • A great new program that just got funded;
  • A foundation or government agency with a new grant offering;
  • A new government initiative that will affect the nonprofit community;
  • The impact that grant funding had for you and/or your organization; and
  • Insights that will help organizations and businesses build capacity to accomplish their mission.
  • (Please feel free to pitch other nonprofit and business themes.)
  •  

This is a unique new opportunity developed by Libby Hikind, the founder and CEO of GrantWatch.com, GrantWriterTeam.com, GrantNews.press, and the soon to be released: Uhelpfund.com and GWI.education.  

If you have a question write to us at Editor@grantnews.press 

 

About the Author: Christopher Waldeck is a current social media strategist and content contributor to GrantWatch.com. He looks to connect others with amazing opportunities!

Ideas to Keep in Mind When Working On A Grant Application

Grant Writing TipsGrant writing is a wonderful lucrative career for persons who have excellent written communication skills, are well organized, creative, data-driven, and have a strong attention to detail.  Grant writing is a highly specialized form of sales communication. 

 

Here are a few tips to to keep in mind when working on a grant application.

  1. Accuracy. Funding sources specify their requirements: what materials they want, how they want them, what information they need and when. Follow those instructions to the letter. If not, your application will wind up in the virtual circular file.
  2. More accuracy. Make sure that spelling, punctuation, and all information regarding your proposal is 100% correct. Your proposal reflects your general attitude towards your work. 
  3. Start early. Organize your thoughts to define the project.  Leave enough time to perfect the application and increase your odds of success. Deadline stress does not produce top-quality work.
  4. Get a second eye. Or even better, a third or a fourth pair of eyes. Outside perspectives can provide valuable critiques of style, presentation, and will identify errors that a person close to the work may have missed.
  5. Avoid technical gobbledygook. Remember that the people or Board of Directors reviewing your application will be reading many proposals.  You want them to find your statistics interesting, accurate, from reliable sources and relevant to the topic.
  6. Keep it clear, concise and honest. Don’t waste time and space repeating and repeating with blah, blah and more blah. Don’t present your organization as more accomplished than it is. Speak about your real successes.
  7. Research the Foundation. Understanding the funding sources' mission, preferences and who they recently funded will help you speak their language.
  8. Network. Find someone who knows someone who knows someone who can mention your organization’s name to the Board. Of course, the fewer degrees of separation, the better.  Invite the individual to see your program first hand. Do not ever do this wirh a government fundied grant that prohibits lobbying!
  9. Include your staff in the process. Your staff will contibute to the content with current up-to-date information, recent testimonials, and most likely have some budgetary and programmatic suggestions.
  10. Consider investing in yourself. Build your skills with books, courses, consult with experienced grant writers, and utilize online resources.

 

If you are a successful grant writer, consider joining GrantWriterTeam.com where you can bid for professional grant writing jobs.